Obama’s New Illegal Alien Czar

Frank Crimi in FrontPage Immigration law enforcement suffered another blow when the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently announced the appointment of Andrew Lorenz-Strait as the nation’s first “public advocate” for the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency (ICE). According to ICE Director John Morton, the public advocate position was created by the Obama administration to handle questions and complaints by illegal aliens over the various changes the DHS has made in the past year concerning the way immigration authorities determine which undocumented immigrants are deported. As such, Morton said Lorenz-Strait “will work to expand and enhance our dialogue with the stakeholder community. We want the public to know that they have a representative at this agency whose sole duty is to ensure their voice is heard and their interests are recognized.” Despite the fact that this “stakeholder community” willingly failed to obey US immigration laws in order to enter the country, the federal agency charged with enforcing immigration laws has now seen fit to give them their own taxpayer-funded lobbyist. This irony wasn’t lost on Shawn Moran, Vice President of the National

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Eric Holder’s Protection of Voter Fraud

Frank Crimi in FrontPage Seeking to overturn a DOJ judgment that its voter photo identification law, passed in May 2011, violates the National Voting Rights Act (NVRA), the state of South Carolina recently announced that it is suing the Justice Department and Attorney General Eric Holder in federal court. The decision by South Carolina comes as the DOJ is vigorously working to stop the spread of states enacting or implementing voter photo ID laws, prompting fears that the Obama administration is undermining the integrity of the upcoming 2012 elections. In December 2011, the DOJ blocked South Carolina’s new voter ID law from taking effect when it determined the South Carolina law was discriminatory, citing an unfair burden on minority voters. That unfair burden required registered South Carolina voters to produce a state-issued photo ID or a federal substitute, such as a US passport or military ID, at the polls in order to cast a ballot. The passage of the law was prompted by a state review of voter registration rolls that found 85,000 registered voters in South Carolina lacked a

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Eric Holder and Operation Stonewall

Frank Crimi in FrontPage In recent testimony before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, a combative Attorney General Eric Holder strongly denied the Justice Department is engaged in a cover-up over its involvement in “Operation Fast and Furious,” the failed gun-buying probe which led to the death of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry and over 300 hundred Mexican citizens. Instead, Holder said the 14-month congressional probe into the failings of Fast and Furious had devolved into nothing but a “political” effort intended to embarrass the Obama administration. Holder’s accusations were echoed by Democrats on the House committee who released an 89-page report prior to Holder’s testimony, which read in part: “The Committee has obtained no evidence that Operation Fast and Furious was a politically-motivated operation conceived and directed by high-level Obama Administration political appointees at the Department of Justice.” Of course, to be fair, it’s difficult to find conclusive evidence of wrongdoing when the Attorney General has withheld from congressional investigators over 80,000 DOJ documents related to Fast and Furious, as well as preventing key Justice Department officials with knowledge of the

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The Uncertain Fate of Syria’s Chemical Weapons

Frank Crimi in FrontPage Four Syrian-bound Iranian trucks carrying raw materials needed to make chemical weapons were recently seized by Turkish authorities as they tried to enter into Syria from southern Turkey. The contents in the trucks reportedly included cylindrical tanks, heat-resistant materials and 66 tons of sodium sulfate. While the Iranian government denied that the trucks in question were carrying chemical weapon materials, it should be noted that in 2011 Turkish authorities had intercepted two previous arms shipment from Iran to Syria. One of those shipments was an Iranian plane carrying automatic rifles, rocket launchers and mortars. However, the finding of chemical weapons material in the Iranian trucks — which comes as the embattled regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad edges closer to complete collapse — has renewed fresh concerns over the future security and control of Syria’s vast stockpile of chemical weapons. Similar fears were raised during the collapse of the Libyan regime of Muammar Gadhafi. In that case, the United States and its NATO allies worked with Libyan rebel forces to monitor Libya’s known chemical-weapon facilities and

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Libya: The New Al-Qaeda Stronghold

Frank Crimi in FrontPage According to Western counter-terrorism officials, al-Qaeda terrorists have established a 200-strong fighting force near the Egyptian border in eastern Libya. The creation of the al-Qaeda unit comes at the same time as the Libyan interim government is threatened by a growing internecine conflict among Libya’s myriad group of armed rebel militias. The al-Qaeda terrorists, who had arrived in Libya in early 2011 at the time Muammar Gadhafi’s regime was rapidly ceding ground to Libyan rebels, were reportedly sent to Libya on personal orders from al-Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri. The jihadists are purportedly led by a veteran al-Qaeda fighter known simply as “AA,” a terrorist insurgent who began his terror career fighting Soviet forces in Afghanistan before coming to Britain to recruit Muslims for al-Qaeda. In 2005 “AA” had been detained by British authorities as a suspect in the July 2005 London subway bombing that killed 52 people and wounded more than 700, although he was never charged in that attack. By 2009 “AA” had left Britain to fight coalition forces on the Afghan-Pakistan border. The efforts by

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Nigeria’s Coming Civil War

Frank Crimi in FrontPage The Islamist terror group Boko Haram’s escalating war against Christians and a violent nationwide protest against the end to government fuel subsidies have brought Nigeria to the edge of civil war. Boko Harem began its current escalation with the Christmas Day suicide bombing of St. Theresa’s Catholic Church in Niger state, an attack which killed over 50 people. The bombing of St. Theresa induced Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan on December 31 to place the Muslim-dominant northern Nigerian states of Borno, Yobe, Niger and Plateau — areas that have been witness to most of Boko Haram’s attacks — under emergency rule. For its part, Boko Harem responded to the emergency declaration by issuing a 3-day ultimatum to southern Christians living in the north of Nigeria to leave. When the ultimatum’s deadline expired, Boko Harem members subsequently killed over 60 Christians in gun and bomb attacks. In the process, a Boko Haram spokesman let it be known that the Islamist group’s deadly reach wasn’t confined to a specific geographic region, saying, “We can really go to wherever we

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A Day in the Life of Sharia

Frank Crimi in FrontPage In December 2011, Sahar Gul, a 15-year-old Afghan girl and underage bride, was freed by Afghan police after having been severely tortured for six months by her in-laws in an attempt to force her into prostitution. During her captivity, Sahar had been kept locked in a basement, tortured with hot irons, her fingers broken and fingernails ripped out. While Sahar’s horrific ordeal sparked justifiable outrage among many Afghans, her agony is all too commonplace in Afghanistan, a country in which violence against women and girls is both pervasive and growing. The violent abuse used against Afghan females also entails the widespread and socially accepted practice of forced child marriage, a cultural and religious reality that has led to over half of the marriages in Afghanistan involving girls under the age of 16. So, given that, it’s not surprising to find that in the decade after the ouster of the Taliban from power in 2001, Afghanistan still remains one of the world’s most dangerous places for women. According to the UN’s Gender Inequality Index, Afghanistan ranks as

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